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Factsheet for Austria

1. General facts

CountryAustria (AT)
Surface area83,872 Km²
Population (thousands)8341
Population density99
Persons per household2.3
GDP per capita PPS124
GDP per capita
Household characteristics40% in densely populated areas (at least 500 inhab./km2)
24% in intermediate urbanised areas (100 - 499 inhab./km2)
36% in sparsely populated areas (less than 100 inhab/km2)
Gross value added23% Industry, including energy
7.7% Construction
23.6% Trade, transport and communication services
23.4% Business activities and financial services
20.7% Other services
1.7% Agriculture, hunting and fishing

2. Legislation overview

According to the Austrian constitution the responsibility for waste management is split between federal and provincial governments. Legislation and execution concerning hazardous waste is a federal task. For other waste types the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management is responsibly only in cases where country-wide provisions are required. The federal government made use of this competence by issuing a number of ordinances for specific waste streams as well as waste treatment methods. Selected types of waste management facilities are governed by commercial law and not by waste legislation.

The main piece of waste legislation is the Act on waste management 2002, which sets the frame for waste management in Austria. More specific provisions, e.g. on certain waste streams or waste treatment methods, are dealt with in a number of waste ordinances which are based on the main waste act.

2.2 National acts

ReferenceMain content
Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz 2002 - Bundesgesetz der Republik Österreich, mit dem ein Bundesgesetz über eine nachhaltige Abfallwirtschaft (Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz 2002 – AWG 2002) erlassen wird. BGBl. I 102/2002
(Act on waste management 2002 – Federal law of the Republic of Austria with which the act on a sustainable waste management is enacted)
The Act on waste management 2002 is the main piece of waste legislation in Austria. It is structured in 10 chapters:
1. General provisions
2. Waste prevention and -recovery
3. General obligations for waste owners
4. Waste collection and treatment companies
5. Collection and Recovery Systems
6. Treatment facilities
7. Transboundary shipment of waste
8. Treatment orders, supervision
9. Transition provisions
10. Final clauses
Gewerbeordnung 1994
(Commerce regulation ordinance)
For certain waste management facilities, which are not covered by the Waste Management Act, the Commerce Regulation Ordinance contains rules for permissions and for the handling of accidents in facilities.

2.2.2 National legislation

NameReferenceYear
LandfillOrdinance on Landfilling, Law Gazette II No. 164/1996 amended 49/2004 Ordinance on limitation of leachate emissions from landfills, Gazette II No. 263/2003 2004
IncinerationOrdinance on Waste Incineration, Law Gazette No. II 389/2002 2002

2.2.3 Selected legislation

NameReference
BMW (Biodegradable municipal waste) Ordinance on the Separate Collection of Organic Wastes, Gazette II No. 68/1992 Law on the prohibition of incinerating biogenic materials outside of facilities, Gazette I No 405/1993 Ordinance on Compost, Gazette II No 292/2001
PackagingOrdinance on the prevention and recovery of packaging waste and certain product residues and on collection and recovery schemes, Law Gazette II No 648/1996 Ordinance on the take back and deposit charging for refillable beverage packaging made of plastic, Law Gazette II No 513/1990
Construction and demolition wasteOrdinance on the Separation of Materials Accumulated during Construction Work, Law Gazette II 259/1991

2.3 Regional waste acts

 

 

Waste Acts of the Austrian provinces

 

All regional Waste Management Acts pass over the responsibility for the collection and management of municipal waste to the municipalities. The way, the way municipalities can or have to form inter-municipality waste associations, is dealt with very differently. Also further regulations concerning municipal waste collection and treatment vary significantly. In some Acts (but not in all) the following topics are covered:

-         Rules for prevention and recovery of waste

-         Collection of municipal waste

-         Waste fees

Waste management plans for waste associations.

·        Burgenländisches Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1994/10

·        Kärntner Abfallwirtschaftsordnung, LGBl 2004/17

·        Niederösterreichisches Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1992/8240-0

·        Oberösterreichisches Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1997/86

·        Salzburger Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1999/35

·        Steiermärkisches Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl  2004/65

·        Tiroler Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1990/50

·        Vorarlberger Abfallgesetz, LGBl  2006/1

·        Wiener Abfallwirtschaftsgesetz, LGBl 1994/13

3. Waste management plans

According to the division of responsibilities (see chapter on legislation), the federal government as well as the regional governments issue waste management plans for their field of competence. These provincial plans have to be presented to the Federal Minister of Environment, who integrates relevant parts into the national plan.

3.1 National plan

The national waste management plan is based on Article 8 the Waste Management Act. The responsibility for issuing the plan lies with the Minister for Environment. The plan has to comprise:

·         an inventory/review of the situation of the waste management system;

·         the regional distribution of the facilities for the disposal of waste;

·         concrete requirements concerning prevention, recovery and disposal of waste as well as waste shipment;

·         planned measures of the federal government to reach these requirements;

·         provisions for specific waste streams, esp. programmes and treatment principles.

The first national waste management plan was issued in 1992. Until 2001 the plan was updated every three years. From 2001 the updating period was extended to five years. The current waste management plan was published in 2006.

It is not completely clear whether the provisions of the Austrian waste management plan are legally binding.

Period of implementation

Main content

2006 - 2011

Federal waste management plan 2006:

1        Selected groups of waste.
22 waste streams with data and information on waste characteristics, quantities, prevention, recovery and disposal.

2        Recovery and disposal plants.
Data about number and capacities of 12 types of waste treatment facilities.

3        Targets and measures:

-           General measures

-           Regulatory measures

-           Product- and waste-related measures

-           Plant-related measures

-           Strategies for waste prevention and recovery

4        Guidelines for the shipment of waste and treatment principles:

-           General principles for the shipment of waste

-           Application of the Annexes of the Waste Shipment Regulation

-           Principles for the treatment of particular waste and material flows

5        Remediation of contaminated sites.

The waste management plan 2006 contains also the Strategy for prevention and recovery of waste in Austria, which has been published in a separate document.

 

The English version of the National Waste Management Plan 2006 can be found on the internet: http://www.bundesabfallwirtschaftsplan.at/article/articleview/52746/1/13192/

 

 

3.2 Regional plans

The current waste management plans of the Austrian provinces are listed below. The contents of the plans differ and cannot be summarised here.

Burgenland: Landes-Abfallwirtschaftsplan für das Burgenland 2006

http://www.bmv.at/publicmedia/384_BGLD_AWP_20061110.pdf

Kärnten: Kärntner Abfallbericht und Abfallwirtschaftskonzept 2006

http://www.verwaltung.ktn.gv.at/cgi-bin/evoweb.dll/cms/akl/23926_DE-Abfallwirtschaft-IK-2006K%e4rntner_Abfallwirtschaftsbericht.pdf

Niederösterreich: Niederösterreichischer Abfallwirtschaftsplan 2004

http://www.noel.gv.at/bilder/d7/AWP04.pdf

Oberösterreich: Oberösterreichischer Abfallbericht 2006

http://www.land-oberoesterreich.gv.at/cps/rde/xbcr/SID-D6B1DE2C-CF78E46D/ooe/u_abfallbericht2006.pdf

Salzburg: Salzburger Abfallwirtschaftsplan 2006

http://www.salzburg.gv.at/sbgawp2006.pdf

Steiermark: Landes-Abfallwirtschaftsplan 2005

http://www.abfallwirtschaft.steiermark.at/cms/dokumente/10166362_4334719/7b21b4b2/LAWPL_2005_Internet.pdf

Tirol: Tiroler Abfallstatistik 2006

http://www.tirol.gv.at/themen/umwelt/abfall/abfallstatistik

Vorarlberg: Vorarlberger Abfallwirtschaftskonzept 2006

http://www.vorarlberg.at/pdf/vorarlbergerabfallwirtsc4.pdf

Wien: Das Wiener Abfallwirtschaftskonzept 2007

http://www.wien.gv.at/ma48/awk/index.htm

4. Waste prevention for Austria

4.1. Objectives

The main Waste Management Act 2002 contains the waste hierarchy. The first principle of waste management is (Art. 1(2)): “The quantities and hazardousness of waste have to be kept as low as possible (waste prevention).”

Article 9 mentions the objectives of sustainable waste prevention:

Waste arisings and contents of hazardous substances in waste shall be reduced by:

·        the application of appropriate production and distribution processes,

·       the eco-designed products.

making consumers aware of waste prevention.

4.2. Targets

No waste prevention targets for specific waste streams have been specified.

(For the waste stream WEEE a combined target for reuse and recycling has been set.)

 

4.3. Strategy

General rules for waste prevention (waste hierarchy, objectives) are set in the Waste Management Act 2002. Furthermore this act authorises the Minister of Environment to adopt ordinances containing following waste prevention measures:

-           product labelling requirements,

-           information obligations on a design of products which takes into account repair, reuse, recycling and treatment,

-           give back, take back, reuse or recycling obligations

-           waste prevention, collection or recycling quota

-           collection of a deposit

-           product design requirements

-           ban of products containing certain hazardous substances

-           ban of lubricants which cause high environmental pressures

-           reporting obligations

-           waste treatment levies.

Based on this authorisation a number of policy instruments have been implemented. Most of them, however, are based on EU legislation (see chapter on Policy Instruments). In addition, the Austrian Ministry for Environment has developed a waste prevention and recycling strategy within its Federal Waste Management Plan 2006, which is presented in the following table.

 

 

Austrian waste prevention and recycling strategy

 

Scope

As general approach, the strategy covers the whole production and consumption chain. Concrete measures have been defined for specific waste streams (see “Description of the instrument”)

Year of introduction:

2006

 

Transition period:

No

Objectives:

 

For the Waste Prevention and Recycling Strategy the following objectives were set:

-           emission reduction

-           reduction of hazardous substances and of their dissipation

-           and resource efficiency

 

Targets:

No specific targets defined.

Description of the instrument:

 

The Austrian Waste Prevention and Recycling Strategy was based on:

-           a stakeholder-process featuring a series of workshops under participation of interest groups, regional and federal administration and waste experts

-           technical and socio-economic analyses for selected waste streams and instruments.

The strategy resulted in a bunch of measures with waste prevention context.

-           Prevention and Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste

-           Product Related Substance Flow Analysis

-           Ban of Nickel-Cadmium-Accumulators

-           Reusable Packaging

-           Services for Products

 

Implementation:

The Waste Prevention and Recycling Strategy is a framework programme for the waste management sector in general and for the federal waste management administration in particular.

The implementation steps are continuously elaborated based on studies, pilot projects and negotiations with stakeholder. For the topic “services for products”, for example, an implementation study resulted in the recommendation to support the market introduction of home services and of reuse-centres.

Result

In the connection with the elaboration of the next national waste management plan, the strategy for prevention and recovery of waste will be reviewed and updated.

4.4. Policy instruments

4.4.1. Regulatory instruments

Overview

no information

Bans

Regulatory instrument
Titlemercury and cadmium
Waste streamBatteries, Accumulators
Year1990
Legal documentBatteries Ordinance (BGBl. 159/2008)
Regulatory instrument
Titlelead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium
Waste streamELV
Year2002
Legal documentELV Ordinance (BGBl. 407/2002)
Regulatory instrument
Titlelead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, PBB, PBDE
Waste streamWEEE
Year2005
Legal documentWEEE Ordinance (BGBl. 121/2005)
Regulatory instrument
Titlelead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium
Waste stream1996
Year1996
Legal documentPackaging Ordinance (BGBl. 648/1996)

Other instruments

Regulatory instrument
Titleno information
ScopeLubricants for chain saws
Year1991
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionLubricants containing PCB and PCT must not be put on the market
ImplementationArt. 3 Lubricants Ordinance (BGBl. 647/1990)
ResultNo information
Regulatory instrument
Titleno information
ScopeMotor oils
Year1991
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionMotor oils containing halogenated additives, cadmium, mercury and arsenic must not be put on the market
ImplementationArt. 3 Lubricants Ordinance (BGBl. 647/1990)
ResultNo information
Regulatory instrument
TitleReuse
ScopeWEEE
Year2005
Transition periodno information
Objectivesno information
Targetsno information
DescriptionProducers have to reuse complete WEEE, if technically and economically feasible.
ImplementationWEEE Ordinance (BGBl. 121/2005)
Resultno information
Regulatory instrument
TitleReuse
ScopeELVs
Year2002
Transition periodno information
Objectivesno information
Targetsno information
DescriptionCar producers and importer have to reuse reusable components of ELVs as far as possible
ImplementationELV Ordinance (BGBl. 407/2002)
Resultno information
Regulatory instrument
TitleReuse
ScopePackaging Waste
Year1996
Transition periodno information
Objectivesno information
Targetsno information
DescriptionExemptions for reusable packaging from the strict rules of the Packaging Ordinance
ImplementationPackaging Ordinance (BGBl. 648/1996)
Resultno information
Regulatory instrument
TitleEco Design
ScopePackaging waste
Year1996
Transition periodno information
Objectives- Volume and weight of packaging has to be reduced to the minimum - Packaging has to be designed, produced and distributed in a way that reuse and recovery are possible
Targetsno information
Descriptionno information
ImplementationPackaging Ordinance (BGBl. 648/1996)
Resultno information
Regulatory instrument
TitleEco Design
ScopeWEEE
Year2005
Transition periodno information
Objectives- EEE have to be designed in a way that disassembling and recovery, especially reuse and recycling of end of life products, its components and materials are considered and facilitated. - Construction and production must not interfere with reusability
Targetsno information
Descriptionno information
ImplementationWEEE Ordinance (BGBl. 121/2005)
Resultno information
Regulatory instrument
TitleEco Design
ScopeELVs
Year2002
Transition periodno information
Objectives- Limit use of hazardous substances in cars, - consider recovery of materials when designing and producing cars, - increased use of secondary raw materials
Targetsno information
Descriptionno information
ImplementationELV Ordinance (BGBl. 407/2002)
Resultno information

Additional info

no information

4.4.2. Market-based instruments

Overview

no information

Other instruments

Market-based instrument
TitleSubsidies
ScopeSubsidies for innovative technologies for prevention or recovery of waste
Year1993
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesThe objective of the subsidies in waste management is to foster the use of technologies for recovery and intra-company prevention of hazardous waste
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionThe subsidy rates are based on the principles of the Waste Management Act. They are graduated according to measures for the prevention, recovery or disposal of hazardous waste. Prevention measures to reduce non-hazardous waste can be subsidised in the context of pilot plans only.
ImplementationEnvironmental Support Act (BGBl. 185/1993)
ResultNo information

Additional info

no information

4.4.3. Information-based instruments

Overview

Information based instruments, based on EU legislation

 

Information

Target group

Waste stream

Year of introduction (amendm.)

Legal document

-    Capacity (life span of products)

-    higher content of heavy metals

-    the potential effects on the environment and human health of the substances used in batteries and accumulators

Final consumer

Batteries, Ac­cumula­tors

1990 (2008)

Batteries Ordinance (BGBl. 159/2008)

 

Waste prevention and waste management aspects (e.g. ecodesign)

Final consumer

ELV

2002

ELV Ordinance (BGBl. 407/2002)

Use of component and material coding standards, in particular to facilitate the identification of those components and materials, suitable for reuse and recovery

Disassembling companies

ELV

2002

ELV Ordinance (BGBl. 407/2002)

Additional info

no information

4.4.4. Voluntary instruments

Overview

No instruments

Additional info

no information

Examples

TitleDescription
Ruso – reuse shops Upper Austria (Oesterreichisches Oekologie-Institut, OeSB Consulting & ThinkAustria Unternehmensberatung (2008): ruso – reuse shops oberoesterreich) Due to faster changing living conditions, household equipment is replaced much quicker. That means that more and more household equipment is discarded long before the end of its lifetime. A reuse infrastructure would help to adapt to changing living conditions at lower cost, lower resource consumption and lower waste production.
Following the example of the Flemish ReUse Shop Chain the waste management sector of upper Austria and social institutions plan to establish a chain of up to 22 ReUse-Shops till 2015 based on existing waste collection infrastructure in the province of Upper Austria. The following figure shows a scheme of the reuse infrastructure to be established. Other regions of Austria are considering to establish similar systems.

http://cdr.eionet.europa.eu/at/eea/wastepolicies/envsbu4tq/austria_1.JPG

Scheme of a fully developed ReUse-Infrastructure

For further waste prevention success stories please click on the following link:
http://waste.eionet.europa.eu/facts/wastebase/prevention

4.5 Waste prevention examples

Since the early 1990s the Vienna government has financed or co-financed several hundred studies and pilot projects on waste prevention. Among the outstanding projects are:

-           OekoKauf Wien (EcoPurchasing Vienna): The city of Vienna annually purchases some EUR 5 billion in goods. 17 working groups consisting of environmental, technical and purchasing experts have developed guidelines and purchasing catalogues for the green public procurement of some 60 product groups. These guidelines are available in German language on http://www.wien.gv.at/umweltschutz/oekokauf/ergebnisse.html. A guideline was also prepared on the sustainable management of construction sites (http://www.rumba-info.at/files/kurzbericht_rumba_english.pdf).

-           ÖkoBusinessPlan (EcoBusinessPlan) provides financially aided cleaner production and eco-efficiency consultancy to Vienna enterprises. Since the start of this initiative in 1998 some 600 enterprises have received professional advice, resulting in cost savings of about EUR 34 million.

-           The Wiener Web-Flohmarkt (Vienna Web-Flea-Market) offers an exchange platform for used goods (including cars, books, furniture etc.), construction equipment and material, as well as gardening equipment and material on the internet.

-           R.U.S.Z. (repair and service centre) provides affordable repair and tuning services for electrical household appliances. Electric goods, which are at the end or their life time, are disassembled, providing for their material recycling. Long term jobless are trained and employed in this scheme. For the future, R.U.S.Z. plans to offer also small repair services directly in the home area and to support especially elder people when dealing with the maintenance of their home equipment.

Further information can be obtained at the following webpage:

http://www.wien.gv.at/umweltschutz/abfall/vermeidung.html

5. Construction and Demolition Waste for Austria

5.1. Objectives

There is no specific objectives for C&D-Waste as such, only the general objectives of waste management are applied.

5.2. Targets

No specific collection or recycling targets for C&D-waste have been set.

5.3. Strategy

The management of C&D waste is legally regulated with an obligation for separate collection of certain materials and an obligation for the recovery of C&D waste. Requirements for the quality of C&D waste for recycling (content of certain substances) are stipulated in the Austrian Waste Management Plan. Additional instruments, like quality criteria for constructions materials made of recycled C&D waste, are only voluntary.

5.4. Policy instruments

5.4.1. Regulatory instruments

Regulatory instrument
TitleObligation for separate collection
Scope8 waste materials deriving from construction and demolition work above certain quantities
Year1993
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionThe mentioned waste materials have to be kept separate either on site or at the treatment facility. The separation has to be carried out in a way that recovery is possible
ImplementationOrdinance on the separation of C&D-waste (BGBl. 259/1991)
ResultNo information
Regulatory instrument
TitleObligation for recovery
ScopeWaste deriving from construction work
Year1993
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionRecoverable waste has to be recovered, if it is ecologically advantageous, technically feasible and not connected to disproportional high costs.
Implementation§16 (7) Waste Management Act (BGBl. I 102/2002)
ResultNo information
Regulatory instrument
TitleRequirements on the quality of C&D-Waste for recycling
ScopeC&D-Waste deriving from construction work (without building)
Year2006
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionC&D-waste needs to meet certain limit values to be used for certain recovery purposes
ImplementationPart of the Austrian Waste Management Plan 2006
ResultNo information

Additional info

no information

5.4.2. Market-based instruments

Additional info

No instruments

5.4.3. Information-based instruments

Information-based instrument
Title"Series of Technical guidelines for C&D recycling materials" and "Ecolabel for C&D recycling materials"
ScopeRecycled construction materials
Year2004
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesTo guarantee the quality of recycled building materials and to assure their quality based on the issuance of quality certificates/labels for recycled construction materials.
TargetsChemical limit values for recycled construction materials.
DescriptionDefinition of quality criteria (concentration limits for pollutants in the material itself as well as it the eluate) for building materials deriving from C&D waste recycling.
ImplementationVoluntary guidelines of a trade association, recommendation of the Ministry for Environment to use these guidelines.
ResultNo information

Additional info

no information

5.4.4. Voluntary instruments

Additional info

No instruments

6. Biodegradable Municipal Waste - Austria

6.1. Objectives

General objectives are not mentioned for the waste stream BMW as such, but for selected BMW fractions (see instruments).

6.2. Targets

Recycling target for packaging paper waste: 60%

Limit value for landfilling of waste: 5% TOC

6.3. Strategy

The Austrian strategy to divert Biodegradable Municipal Waste away from landfills works with two approaches.

Biodegradable municipal waste shall be collected separately in order to allow for recovery operations producing high quality products. The obligation for separate collection refers to biowaste and packaging paper waste. The separate collection is supported with additional measures. The Compost Ordinance regulates the quality of compost produced of waste with the aim to improve its competitiveness on the market. Recycling targets for packaging paper waste can only be reached, if a proper collection system is installed.

The second approach is the ban of untreated waste going to landfills. Waste with TOC above 5% has to be either incinerated or pre-treated in mechanical biological facilities.

The two approaches are supplemented by a fee for the landfilling of waste. The objective of this fee is to finance the remediation of contaminated sites. The amount of the fee depends on the type of waste and the technical quality of the landfill. One side effect of the fee is that the price for landfilling is increased, so that waste streams are redirected to other waste management routes.

6.4. Policy instruments

6.4.1. Regulatory instruments

Regulatory instrument
TitleSeparate collection of biowaste
ScopeBiowaste: Garden waste, vegetable food waste from household and commerce, plant residues from commercial and industrial processing and from the distribution of agricultural and forestry products
Year1995
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsNo specific target mentioned
DescriptionBiowaste has to be made available for separate collection, unless it is home composted.
ImplementationOrdinance on the Separate Collection of Organic Wastes, Law Gazette II No. 68/1992 Ordinance on Compost, Law Gazette II No. 292/2001
ResultSeparately collected Biodegradable waste has risen from a few thousand tonnes in 1989 to about 530 000 t in 2003. Recycling rate of Biowaste was around 65% in 1999, not including home composting.
Regulatory instrument
TitleSeparate collection of packaging waste
ScopePackaging waste
Relevant fraction in relation to BMW is packaging paper waste.
Year1997
Transition periodNo
Objectives• Introduction of producer responsibility: • Prevention of packaging waste • Limitation of heavy metals in packaging • Recycling and recovery targets Limitation of packaging waste going to landfills (according to material types)
TargetsRecycling target for packaging paper waste: 60%
DescriptionObligation for separate collection and recycling of packaging paper waste
ImplementationOrdinances on Packaging, Law Gazette II No. 1996/648 and 1992/646
ResultThe quantity of packaging waste (without consideration of beverage packaging) has been reduced by more than 50% from 1991 to 1998. In 2003, 580.000 t of paper waste (not only packaging) have been collected separately.
Regulatory instrument
TitleBan on landfilling
ScopeWaste for landfilling
Year1997
Transition period31. December 2008
ObjectivesNo specific objectives mentioned
TargetsLimit value for landfilling of waste: 5% TOC
DescriptionIt is prohibited to landfill waste with an organic content of 5% (measured as TOC). Consequently, the waste has to be pre-treated by incineration or mechanical biological treatment before landfilling.
ImplementationOrdinance on Landfilling, Law Gazette II No. 164/1996, amended 49/2004
ResultNo information

Additional info

no information

6.4.2. Market-based instruments

Market-based instrument
TitleFee on landfilling of waste (ALSAG-fee)
ScopeLandfilling of waste
Year1989
Transition periodNo
ObjectivesObjective of the law is to finance the remediation of contaminated sites
TargetsNo specific targets mentioned
DescriptionFee must be paid for the landfilling of waste by the operator of a landfill or storage. Fees are collected by custom officers and transferred to the Ministry
Collected money is used for remediation of contaminated sites (85%) and complementary investigations. The currently valid ALSAG rates are shown in the table below
ImplementationAct on Remediation of contaminated sites, Federal Law Gazette I 136/2004
ResultFrom 1989 until 2002 about 700 Mio EURO have been collected and subsequently spent for more than 140 remediation projects.

Additional info

From 1989 until 2002 about 700 Milion EURO have been collected and subsequently spent for more than 140 remediation projects.

Landfills acting according to the latest state of development of modern methods

From 2001

From 2004

From 2008

Excavated soil landfill

 

 

EUR   8.00

Construction waste landfill

EUR   5.8

EUR   7.20

EUR   8.00

Residual material landfill

EUR 10.9

EUR 14.50

EUR 18.00

(Municipal waste landfill

EUR 14.5

EUR 21.80

EUR 26.00

Landfills where still waste with high biodegradable content is deposited

 

 

EUR 87.00

1)… when landfill has no basement seal system or no vertical enclosure

6.4.3. Information-based instruments

Additional info

No instruments

6.4.4. Voluntary instruments

Additional info

No instruments

Results

Biodegradable municipal waste

The 2016 target of the Landfill Directive to divert BMW away from landfills has already been met in 2001.

Construction and demolition waste

According the National Waste Management Plan 2006, the recycling rate for C&D waste has increased from 15% in 1985 up to more than 70% in 2006.

Waste prevention

The measures of the Austrian Waste Prevention and Recycling Strategy are still under development, so that no information on results are available.

7. Bibliography

8. Country links to national waste information